On standards

Working alongside product companies allows experiencing the impact of sharing the same practices across the entire enterprise architecture. Some call this standardization, which in theory brings only advantages for both the product company and the end-users. Reusing same technical, functional and user experience design across products or modules of the same product offers consistency and provides the future direction. But what happens when you realize that the current practices, referred to as standards, are outdated or contain techniques which are far from being best practices? You have a choice. You can continue the work as it is. Or you can … Continue reading On standards

On resolutions

Almost every year there is a top resolution on our list: new year new me. Is it the new me that will guarantee an improved outcome at the end of the year? Or it can be the same me, but more focused on the steps to get there? Most of the time, focusing on the right things represents the most important tactic in achieving our goals. Along the way, part of the plan might change, but as long as we reach the end goals throwing everything away and starting from scratch may not be the way to go. Do we … Continue reading On resolutions

On choices

In the Neuro Web Design: What Makes Them Click? book doctor Susan Weinschenk explains our behavior as application users by neuro-marketing concepts, which are a mix of psychology and user experience concepts. One of the most important topics to consider in an application is the number of choices available to users. In our perception, we feel more connected to an application if we find plenty of choices to select from. But this is not true, in fact is exactly the opposite. When we are in front of a long list of choices our brain freezes and we are not able … Continue reading On choices

On product differentiation

In 1933, Edward Hastings Chamberlain an American economist published the Theory of Monopolistic Competition, in which he sets the ground for the term product differentiation. He considers product differentiation as the process of distinguishing a product or service from others, to make it more attractive to a particular target market. The goal of including differentiation in a product strategy is to establish a position in the market which current and future customers will associate to being unique; thus, the company gains a competitive advantage. The most common sources of differentiation are quality, design, functional features, sales activities (advertising), availability (timing, … Continue reading On product differentiation

On staying relevant

Do you think the product manager of the first instant messaging tool considered that end users will share long texts using the product? Or that they will only send short text messages containing a few words?Writing long texts instead of short messages makes the instant part almost irrelevant.Same goes for sending endless emails instead of arranging a video conference call to clarify the topic.It looks like the software products which have a large set of features available allow users to perform activities which make irrelevant the initial product purpose. On the contrary, a clear set of features keep applications relevant … Continue reading On staying relevant

On on boarding

Disclaimer: This post isn’t commercially related, it represents my experience as an end user. Few days ago my bank relaunched their mobile banking app. Such a good news. I was curious about the new look and feel, so I started to watch the presentation video to see more details about it. I listed below the steps I have to perform before using the new mobile app. Step 1. I have to download the new app (not update the current app version, but to download a new one). Step 2. I have to type in my username and authentication code (generated … Continue reading On on boarding